November 13 2017

How to Get Back into your Creative Life After a Break

Life Happens

We all have things that happen to us that slow our creativity down, or that put a halt to our creativity. I fell behind in my journaling, planning, and overall creative “things,” back in July when my Dad was diagnosed with Stage 4 aggressive cancer (chemo wouldn’t help and surgery wasn’t an option–so it was just a matter of quality of life during the time he had left), and Mr. Rockstar was diagnosed with Crohn’s Disease. I tried to stay creative. I tried to journal. To Plan. To finish out #onebookjuly2017 and #campnanowrimo. But my emotions, thoughts…my mental state was all over the place. Insert Anxiety, Depression, and ADHD, along with the roller coaster of emotions that come with finding out your Dad has inoperable and non-treatable stage 4 cancer, and your husband has a disease that isn’t curable either–I was a wreck!

Still, I tried to maintain some sort of routine, some sort of balance. I tried to be creative. And someday’s I managed to journal, plan, write, art… Other days–I barely seemed to function. The worse my Dad got the worse my emotional state became. My emotions were all over the place. I started grieving well before my Dad died on October 5th. But his death, and my Mom’s subsequent hospitalization (she was admitted into the very same ICU ward as my Dad–within an hour or so of his death she was up there a few rooms down from where he was (he was still in the room, they were kind enough to allow my Mom to say goodbye, for all of us to say goodbye). The doctor’s and nurses all knew who I was–first time they’d had that happen, and they were absolutely wonderful to us.

Fast forward a week, my Mom was in the hospital 8 nights and 9 days. So I was at the hospital for approximately 10 days, because I’d been there the night before when my Dad was helicoptered from their local hospital to the one in Charleston to ICU. By the time my Mom was released I’d already taken care of my Dad’s cremation, and a lot of paperwork for things like insurance, etc. I was on the ball in regards to taking care of my Mom. I was not, however, doing very well in the taking time to grieve for my Dad, taking care of myself (not really), much less housework, planning, journaling, filming videos for Patreon or YouTube, etc. I did manage to do a few loads of laundry somewhere in there so I had some clean clothes to wear when I went back to the hospital (my husband convinced me to go home with him to take a shower and get some sleep–I hadn’t slept but about 3 hours in about 3 days). (I’m sure I was in definite need of a shower by then.)

 

Falling Behind  

Grief is not like many make it out to be. It comes in waves. It’s very much like riding a rollercoaster ride, maybe like that one at Sea World that splashes you with water when you least likely expect it, so not only are you on the ride, but you have added elements of surprise. I took a short break, but I knew for my own mental health I needed to focus on positive things, on things that brought me joy, and let the grief happen organically. So I got back to work… I filmed videos. I even wrote a blog post. I tried to journal but I was having issues… I felt blocked. I wasn’t sure of what it was exactly, but the journal felt wrong, what I was doing felt off, what I wanted to do felt off–I was off kilter so everything was off.

I watched a few YouTube videos, specifically one by Documented Journey, and then a Patreon video by Courtney Diaz (LittleRavenInk), and I managed to create a few pages. I knew I needed to make a change. I wasn’t sure of what change to make, or if the change would even by much more than perhaps a new journal, but I knew I needed to change things up. I’d changed. What had happened was traumatic, and it had changed me, so everything felt off–I felt off. My routine was off. My psyche was off. My anxiety was high. I was fighting depression. My focus was all off so my ADHD was in rare form. I wanted so badly to jump back into my “creative life,” to create art, to write, to journal, to do something… anything–but I couldn’t.

And then something special, quite a bit of synchronicity, happened.

 

Picking Up the Pieces

Picking up the pieces after something like the death of a loved one, the hospitalization of a loved one, especially both happening at the same time, would be difficult for almost anyone, but for me it felt like my whole world had been turned upside down. Trying to explain how close a call it was with my mom, or how hard it was to try to remain positive for my Mom, about my Mom, while my Dad had just died a few door down in ICU, or how hard it was to watch my Mom suffer in pain, delirium, and not know exactly what was wrong… There are no words. No words at all, but I found solace in the words my Dad had spoken to me… “she’s going to need you… you’re stronger than you know… I believe in you….” Those words kept me strong, gave me courage. After my Mom went home there were/are still obstacles to overcome: physical therapy, outpatient surgery, etc, but my Mom is one hell of a strong person. I knew I had to get back to life, to my own life, to living life. I couldn’t wallow–my Dad would not want me to do that, nor did my Mom.

I came home to find happy mail, more than once…

I was overwhelmed by all the love and support… I couldn’t help myself from crying happy tears over all the thoughtfulness, the compassion and generosity that was given to me.

I am finding my way…Some days are harder than others. Some days the waves of grief knock me down and take my breath, other days I let the ebb and flow of the grief wash through me–it’s not easy, But I’m working through things one day at a time.  Synchronicity is something I haven’t talked about a whole lot until lately… but it was hitting me from every direction–like the Universe was speaking directly to me and I needed to listen. I’m listening… I don’t have any sage advice. What has worked for me may or may not work for you. But the best way to get back into doing something is to start doing it. To make time to do it, even if it’s just in small doses to start with. Or to change things up so that you can get your feet wet again before diving straight in. For me it took forcing myself to jump back in, but then I was blocked again. Then I changed things up to fit with how I’d changed. The “synchronicity” helped me do that. Creativity is a great way to help with the grieving process. It doesn’t lessen your grief. Nor does it take the pain away, but it does give you an outlet to pour your feelings, doubts, and thoughts into. It gives you a positive way to work through your grief. It’s also helped me find a little balance, which is helping me find my way back to a routine. I really need to get back on a routine, but I know that I have to make changes because things have changed, I’ve changed. For the better, I think.

If you’ve used creativity, whether it’s art, writing, music, or some other creative outlet to work through your grief I’d appreciate it you’d comment below and tell me about it. 😀


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Copyright 2017. All rights reserved.

Posted November 13, 2017 by Burgess Taylor in category "#onebookjuly", "ADHD", "Anxiety", "Around Here", "art", "Art Journaling", "Balance", "Camp NaNoWriMo", "Cancer", "Creativity", "Depression", "Family", "Fear", "Friends", "Grief", "Home", "Journal", "Journaling", "Life", "Living a Creative Life", "Mental Health", "NaNoWriMo", "Real Life", "Self-Care", "Uncategorized", "Writing", "Writing Life

About the Author

Hello Y'all! I'm a writer, an art journaler, and a coffee addict. I'm working on a novel and chronicling the process and my progress. Grab a cup of Java (or Tea) and sit a spell. :D

4 COMMENTS :

  1. By creativemindmyrenaissance on

    Hello Burgess,

    Understand totally what you’ve been going through. Not easy, and it will leave you feeling a real mixture of emotions. Take your time and talk to others when you feel the need. That includes me!

    I’m Jo – artist, writer, traveller, mental health advocate, music lover, wild west nut intrigued by science, and renaissance soul with a potty sense of humour. I’ve miraculously recovered from thirty years of depression – a medication crisis was the catalyst, I’ve seriously never felt this good – and I’m chronicling the rebuild of my polymath and adventurous, creative lifestyle on my blog, Creating My Odyssey.

    I’m networking with other creatives and reaching people with a voice, and those with depression in particular, to demonstrate that this illness is the most treatable of mental health issues. Purely by enormous good chance through a medication crisis and wonderful neighbours, my husband and I contacted the brilliant mental health team, who, with a combination of medication (known as California Rocket Fuel- love it!) and cognitive behavioural therapy, brought me to where I am now. Which proves that provided sufferers know where to look, help is available. That’s the hard part, which shouldn’t be the case.

    Creating My Odyssey is a great vehicle for my creativity – writing (anecdotal articles – many of which have been published – my epic novel), sculpture, 3D art, painting, drawing, mixed media, digital photography – and also covers a myriad of eclectic subjects, I’m unleashing everything that was previously hidden under a bushel, as a result of which I’ve had articles published on various mental health sites.

    I’m also posting other blog links on my site and would love to exchange links and guest posts with other bloggers, particularly on mental health issues, so if you’re interested, I’d love to hear from you. Also, if possible, to collaborate with creatives, too. Possibly exchange blog posts about creative lives and biz, whatever ideas anyone may have. I’m open to (almost!) anything!

    I’ve also been writing a humongous novel forever, on and off, particularly during young parenthood and depression, to help keep me sane. Alias Jeannie Delaney is the life story of a devastating cowgirl who’s the fastest gun in the west and also bisexual. Since my recovery from depression I’ve decided it’s time to get it out there! I’m blogging about it on my site. My husband has finally taken me in hand and we’re now working our way through it. It is frustrating at times because it’s an enormous enterprise and I need all the help I can get to get it off the ground. 😃 Aside from that, all forms of creativity help distract me from going nuts!

    Thank you so much for reading!

    Jo UK

    http://www.jo-b-creative.blogspot.co.uk
    Kitty Le Roy’s Wild West
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  2. By Heather Dewey Pettet, Writer/Crafter on

    Yes, very well written. I have journaled in the past on the grief I have had over the loss I felt when my son Kyle was diagnosed with autism. I grieved over what he won’t be, what kind of life he won’t have. And I grieved over his behaviors. And I grieved over how he needed to do those behaviors to process his world. How he was so different from other kids. How he needed so much love, just to get through the day. Doing that helped me realize lots of things, including that he has gifts most people don’t, like amazing powers of perception, and incredible eye-hand coordination! He may be a born juggler! And while he may still have social and communication issues, and can get caught up in his own little world, he is the most loving boy I have ever seen. And, he is creative…

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